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Hotline for problems voting

This came across my desk today. I'm just posting for anyone interested. It's about a hotline for anyone having trouble voting related to vision. 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Chris Danielsen
Director of Public Relations
National Federation of the Blind
(410) 659-9314, extension 2330
(410) 262-1281 (Cell)

National Federation of the Blind to Run Blind Voter Hotline

Election Day Hotline to Ensure Blind Voters
Receive Right to Private, Independent Vote

Baltimore, Maryland (November 2, 2012): The National Federation of the Blind, the oldest and largest organization of blind people in the United States, today announced that it will be hosting an Election Day hotline that blind voters, poll workers, and voting rights advocates can call if problems arise with accessible voting technology or if other barriers prevent a blind voter from casting a private and independent ballot.

The Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requires that every polling place have at least one accessible voting machine available for every federal election so that voters with disabilities can cast a private and independent ballot.  The hotline will be available on November 6, 2012, by calling 1-877-632-1940 from 7 a.m. EST to 7 p.m. PST.  Individuals who have experience in the operation of accessible voting technology will be manning the hotline to provide assistance to blind voters, election officials, and voting rights advocates.

Dr. Marc Maurer, President of the National Federation of the Blind, said: “The Help America Vote Act was enacted to ensure that all Americans, including those who are blind or have low vision, receive the basic right to vote privately and independently.  Unfortunately our experience has been that not every polling place is compliant with HAVA.  We will be conducting this voter hotline to make certain that no blind person is denied the right to a private and independent vote.”

Following the November 6th elections, the National Federation of the Blind will conduct an online survey to gather information about the experiences of blind voters. 

The National Federation of the Blind needs your support to ensure that blind children get an equal education, to connect blind veterans with the training and services they need, and to help seniors who are losing vision continue to live independent and fulfilling lives. To make a donation, please go to www.nfb.org.


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About the National Federation of the Blind
The National Federation of the Blind (NFB) is the oldest, largest, and most influential nationwide membership organization of blind people in the United States.  Founded in 1940, the NFB advocates for the civil rights and equality of blind Americans, and develops innovative education, technology, and training programs to provide the blind and those who are losing vision with the tools they need to become independent and successful.  We need your support.  To make a donation, please go to www.nfb.org.


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