Thursday, October 13, 2011

Bravo to these VI teachers of tomorrow

I'm passing along this press release because I thought some readers might be interested. A big bravo and congrads to this group of future teachers of the visually impaired. It means a lot that they are interested in not just learning the mechanics of being blind or visually impaired, but also the "real life" stuff too!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE



CONTACT:


Chris Danielsen


Director of Public Relations


National Federation of the Blind


(410) 659-9314, extension 2330


(410) 262-1281 (Cell)


cdanielsen@nfb.org






National Federation of the Blind Announces Second Teacher of Tomorrow Class Program Offers Teachers of Blind Students Opportunity to Learn about Blindness from Blind People


Baltimore, Maryland (October 13, 2011): The National Federation of the Blind (NFB), the oldest and largest organization of blind people, today announced the 2011 class for its NFB Teacher of Tomorrow program. This program provides participants an opportunity to enhance their educational experience by learning about blindness from successful blind adults, parents of blind children, and blind students.




Dr. Marc Maurer, President of the National Federation of the Blind, said: "We are pleased to welcome the 2011 class of this critically important program. Blind children today are facing many obstacles, a good many of them due to the misinformation and stereotypes about blindness that abound in today's society. The Teacher of Tomorrow program connects teachers of blind students with blind people, offering teachers an invaluable opportunity to learn about the true nature of blindness. Together we can ensure that blind children are given the best education possible."




The class of 2011 is as follows:




1. Deborah Adams, Marshall University


2. Elizabeth Asher, Portland State University


3. Santosh Bommera, University of South Carolina


4. Channing Bond, Florida State University


5. Emily Coleman, Portland State University


6. Connie Craft, Louisiana Tech University


7. Susan Cranker, State University of New York-Potsdam


8. Michael Dickneite, Portland State University


9. Jodi Dowell, Marshall University


10. Tina Foster, Marshall University


11. Katie Godby, University of Louisville


12. Stacey Hildenbrand, University of Louisville


13. Jeannette Isaacson, Portland State University


14. Stacy Jena, Northern Illinois University


15. Christopher Kliks, Portland State University


16. Nancy Lentz, Salus University


17. Lisa Long, Portland State University


18. Sheena Manuel, Louisiana Tech University


19. Sheila Martin, Portland State University


20. Shelley McCoy, Ohio State University


21. Bryan Moles, Northern Illinois University


22. Karlestrina Pettigrew, Salus University


23. Grace Quinones, Salus University


24. LaToya Shumate, North Carolina Central University


25. Theresa Smith, Salus University


26. Matthew Stewart, Marshall University






One of the leading objectives of the Teacher of Tomorrow program is to share methods on how to discuss blindness with students and how to best encourage them to develop positive attitudes about blindness. This program also exposes participants to the latest in instructional strategies, access technology, and countless blindness resources.




For more information about the Teacher of Tomorrow program, please contact Rosy Carranza by phone at (410) 659-9314, extension 2283, or by e-mail at rcarranza@nfb.org, or visit www.teachblindstudents.org.










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About the National Federation of the Blind


With more than 50,000 members, the National Federation of the Blind is the largest and most influential membership organization of blind people in the United States. The NFB improves blind people's lives through advocacy, education, research, technology, and programs encouraging independence and self-confidence. It is the leading force in the blindness field today and the voice of the nation's blind. In January 2004 the NFB opened the National Federation of the Blind Jernigan Institute, the first research and training center in the United States for the blind led by the blind.










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